The Amazon Queen of Themyscira and Diana's mother.[36] After meeting the director for the role, Nielsen said, "Patty and I met in London, and we just hit it off from the get-go. We couldn't stop talking. What was supposed to be a one-hour meeting turned into a two-and-a-half-hour lunch and we just really got each other."[37] She described Jenkins's directing style for the film as "She's also the kind of director that I really flourish under. She has very strong and particular and specific ideas about what it is she wants to say. She comes from a place of strength always. And so, when you are dealing with someone like that, you feel absolutely free to be vulnerable, to be creative, and I am a big researcher." On playing the character, Nielsen said, "It was a complete and utter pleasure and I absolutely loved every second of playing her."[38] On her character being Diana's mother and Amazonian queen, Nielsen stated, "I'm queen and I'm preparing my child for a world that entails a lot of responsibility. So it was important to me to bring that into the character."[39] She read The Amazons by Adrienne Mayor to familiarize herself with women warriors and said "I used what I learned in Mayor's book as a rallying cry for how I approached Hippolyta. And then, of course, what is a leader who is elected by her peers every year and has been doing this for a thousand years? That too was interesting to think about". Nielsen went through a workout regimen for the film, saying "I did six hours a day. You know, two hours of weight training, two hours of swords training, and then two hours of horseback riding".
As Wonder Woman, Queen Hippolyta immediately got involved in a time travel mission back to the 1940s with Jay Garrick.[82] After this mission, she elected to join the Justice Society of America and remained in that era for eight years, where her teammates nicknamed her "Polly". During that time she had a relationship with Ted Grant.[83] Hippolyta also made visits into the past to see her godchild Lyta, daughter of Hippolyta's protege Helena, the Golden Age Fury.[volume & issue needed] These visits happened yearly from young Lyta's perspective and also accounted for Hippolyta's participation in the JSA/JLA team ups. When she returned from the past, Hippolyta took Diana's place in the JLA as well.[84][85]
On October 25, 1940, an interview conducted by his partner Olive Byrne (under the pseudonym "Olive Richard") was published in The Family Circle (titled "Don't Laugh at the Comics"), in which Marston said that he saw "great educational potential" in comic books. (A follow-up article was published two years later in 1942.[11]) The interview caught the attention of comics publisher Max Gaines, who hired Marston as an educational consultant for National Periodicals and All-American Publications, two of the companies that would later merge to form DC Comics.
Before I start with my thoughts on this and everything surrounding, let me just say that, FINALLY, the DC Extended Universe gets one right with this movie. You don't know how long I've been waiting to say those words. Though, to be fair, after The Dark Knight Trilogy (THE best superhero trilogy bar none), I haven't kept up with any of DC's efforts to create its own massive universe. I find Superman to be interminably boring, so I had no interest (outside of Michael Shannon) in seeing Man of Steel. DC, in my opinion, made the wrong choice to keep Batman dark and brooding after The Dark Knight Trilogy so, again, I had no real interest in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice outside of maybe seeing Wonder Woman. DC has done a poor job at building its own extended universe so, once again, I had no interest in the Justice League movie. You see how it is. Of the movies in this universe, the only one I've seen was Suicide Squad, which, while decent, wasn't good and squandered its potential. Wonder Woman was the only shining beacon of hope in the horizon, the chance to (finally) do a female superhero movie right. Elektra and Catwoman both sucked and Marvel, since their ascent, wasted their chance to be first in this race by not doing a Black Widow movie. Here's the thing though, before I get to Wonder Woman, and I've mentioned this a lot, but DC Comics is essentially playing catch-up with Marvel. That's why you see them bumbling and fumbling major movies, because they know they have to catch up, since Marvel has, pretty much had a monopoly on this superhero movie business since Iron Man came out in 2008. The thing about Marvel is that they knew they couldn't rush things, they had to slowly plant the seeds for something bigger and, now, you see that that patience has paid off immensely. I don't know how much money the MCU has raked in for Disney (and this is counting merchandising, DVD sales and other forms of revenue), but it has to be a multi-billion dollar franchise for Disney. DC hasn't had the same patience, as they're following the same template without understanding why it worked in the first place. It can't be all at once, it has to be done little by little. Rome wasn't built in a day and DC has attempted to build Rome (with its extended universe) in 20 minutes. But, at the same time, DC wasn't always a point of mockery. DC characters were the first to make the transition from comic to successful major motion pictures with Superman (in 1978) and Batman (in 1989). Marvel was playing catch-up to DC in the era following Batman's successful release. They released some truly awful movies in the 90s, like Captain America in 1990 and The Fantastic Four in 94, which was so bad that it hasn't been released yet. There may have been others, but those are the major ones that pop to mind. So, in DC's defense, they can still make something of their universe. But, and to me this is most important, the whole thing needs to not be so dark and serious. Marvel has succeeded in large part because they know how to pace their movies. They know that you need comedy in movies like this. It can't be all darkness and brooding characters struggling with their own moral dilemmas about what is right and what is wrong. The whole look of the films also needs some more life injected into them. Marvel movies are diverse in settings and cinematography, so, in spite of being set in the same universe, the MCU films feel different tonally and visually. In the DC, every movie sort of looks the same. With a dark, grey and blue hue. And, as great as this movie is, once they get to London, it's really more of the same in terms of visuals. Having said all of that, let's move on shall we? I'm honestly quite surprised that DC waited THIS long to make a Wonder Woman movie, particularly when, to me, this is the movie that should have started your whole extended universe. This should have been the starting point for all things DCEU. Firstly, if we're doing this in chronological order so, technically, this should have been first and, secondly, it's a great movie, so you start off with this and people would actually be pumped for the DCEU instead of looking at things so cynically now. Because as things are now, Wonder Woman feels like the exception to the rule that DCEU movies aren't exactly good. It's an asterisk. And that's not to minimize this film's significance, because I do like the shift and I feel that DC knows that, at least for this moment in time, Wonder Woman is its most important character. People have seen Superman and they've seen Batman and that's not to say that they're tired of the same shit, because there's still many fanboys/girls out there, but I think people want something that's new in that universe and Wonder Woman provides that for people. So that's why, in my opinion, DC needs to worry far more about Wonder Woman, as she needs to be their top priority, for your cinematic universe going forward as opposed to the old, familiar faces. Having said that, let's get going, shall we? I think first I need to talk about Gal Gadot's casting as Wonder Woman. At first, honestly, I didn't get it. Don't get me wrong, Gal Gadot is a very talented and attractive woman, but I just didn't get IT for the longest time. But, having finally seen her as this character, I understand the decision to cast her in the role. Firstly, for some reason or another, she's even more stunningly beautiful as Wonder Woman than even I imagined. Plus, honestly, I find she brings all the values to the character that she needs. So, in my opinion, it's a good combination of both. Diana Prince (Wonder Woman) herself comes from a long line of Amazonian warrior women created by Zeus in order to protect mankind, really, from itself. Ares, the god of war, being tots jelly of humanity, decided to plot its destruction by influencing them and his influence leading to the humans starting wars against each other. Ares has also killed all of the gods with the exception of Zeus himself. Zeus used the last of his power to wound Ares and making him retreat. Long story short, Zeus essentially hid Themyscira (the island the Amazons live in) to keep from Ares from finding it and left them a weapon called the Godkiller for Ares' return. Blah, blah, blah, long story short, Steve Trevor (an Allied spy) crashes his plane off the coast of Themyscira, wherein German soldiers follow him and there, they fight against the Amazonian women who, after losing some of their own, including Diana's aunt, defeat the German soldiers. Steve, after telling them about the Great War (WWI) attempts to enlist the help of the Amazonian women in order to turn the tide of war, but Hippolyta (Diana's mother) has none of it. Steve has found this notebook by this German doctor that tells of an attempt to create a deadlier form of mustard gas, which he's trying to put a stop to or else millions more will die. Diana, being incredibly idealistic, figures that this is Ares' return to the world of men and she needs to put a stop to it by killing Ares. Diana eventually does leave with Steve, she'll never be able to return to Themyscira again as a result. So, eventually, Steve and Diana make their way to London, where they begin their plan to fight back against the Germans (pre-Hitler) and attempt to put a stop to this deadlier mustard gas. I will say that the movie does miss a chance to tell an incredibly interesting story of Diana having to adjust to the gender differences once she makes it to London. Women aren't allowed in the military, they're not even allowed in this war council to discuss an armistice between them and the Germans. Diana, of course, finds her way in this meeting and she browbeats one of the generals for being a coward, acting as if the lives of his soldiers are less important than his own and not fighting alongside his men. Women, at least in this point in time, have not been allowed the vote either. And, honestly, it would have been incredibly interesting to explore that dynamic of Diana, coming from an island where women are clearly superior in every way (even though there's no men) to a place where women are so clearly oppressed. There's a few hints of it here and there, but I think the movie would have benefited from exploring that dynamic a little bit more, in my opinion. One of the things I liked about this movie is that, unlike a lot of superhero movies, I do think they try to give a face at the people that are being affected by the war and how that motivates Diana to try and help them, whether it's by driving the German soldiers from this small town or getting rid of Dr. Maru and Ludendorff, the ones not letting this armistice go through and who are also developing the deadlier mustard gas. There's an interesting debate here that, honestly, I wish the movie would have stuck with. There comes a point, much later in the film where Diana kills Ludendorff, as has been her goal all along, since she feels Ludendorff is Ares and killing him stops the fighting. She does, in fact, kill Ludendorf, but the fighting does not stop. In fact, you could argue, that it gets worse. Diana questions Steve about why the fighting hasn't stopped and there's a discussion between the two where Steve says that, maybe, just maybe that's just how we are, we're (hard)wired to self-destruct. There's just something to the idea that Diana believes that only one person is to blame for all of this and by stopping that one person stops the war itself. It's an interesting idea because it brings to mind the questions that, really, maybe we're not really worth saving in some way, if all we do is keep killing each other every few years. Not many superhero movies deal with this topic in this way. But, of course, you could say that it's a bit of a red herring given that, in fact, Ludendorff was not Ares and, instead, was someone they considered an ally. But it's interesting to explore regardless, given that Diana is still so naive about certain things in 'modern' times and how her idealistic values and ideas aren't shared by everyone around her. I think that's probably one of the best thing this movie does, just sort of explore the idea that not everyone shares Diana's values and how, in a way, her views are sort either antiquated, ahead of their time or both. Steve, who's been helpful to her every step of the way, does stand in her way in some scenes before, of course, Diana takes matter into her own hands. Diana and Steve's relationship is also one of the strongest points of the movies. This is in large part, of course, to how great Gal Gadot and Chris Pine are, their chemistry is excellent and, while the movie does contain a romantic angle between the two, it doesn't feel forced or unnatural. As I mention, Gal Gadot's performance is very strong. She's a badass, but she also brings heart and life to the character. She's not necessarily a goody two-shoes like Captain America, but they share some similarities in how they view the world. You can see how people would be drawn to her kind and compassionate nature and that's not something that, say, a lot of actors playing superheroes are able to capture. The film does have a good bit of action and it is pretty damn good all things considered. There were some parts that I felt were too Zak Snyder-y, like the whole slo-mo things that Zak Snyder abused in 300. But, at the very least, in this case, it can be explained by the fact that one of Diana's superpowers is seeing bullets in slo-mo, which allows her to deflect them before they harm her or anybody. So, at least, it's not a stylistic choice that was abused, it has actual significance. The action gets a thumbs up from me as if that wasn't obvious. So you know how I mentioned earlier that the movie touches on the fact that, maybe, humanity isn't worth saving if all we are is doomed to destroy ourselves. Well, later on in the movie, Diana comes to the realization that, in spite of everything, humanity is worth fighting for. One of the things I didn't like, there's actually a couple of minor issues I had, is the fact that the whole ending of Diana saying that she believes love will end up saving us is really kind of corny and cheesy. Not that the message isn't a worthy one, it's just how it's handled. And, really, Steve's ultimate act of sacrifice was one made for love, so it makes sense that Diana would believe that, it's execution is still a bit corny. Another thing that bothered me is that, ultimately, the fighting DID stop after Diana killed Ares and, I don't know, I feel like that's too simplistic of a conclusion for something as complex as the first World War. I like the earlier themes which, while certainly more bleak (and that's something DCEU could do to remove from its movies), it's still a better conclusion and, at the same time, Diana can still come to the same conclusion she did as a result of Steve's actions. Minor issues, really, as it didn't really affect my overall enjoyment of the film. Having said that, do I think that this is one of the best superhero movies ever made? No, not really. It's the best movie based on one of DC's properties since the Dark Knight Trilogy finished off in 2012. It's a great superhero movie, with a strong origin story at its core, great performances from Gal Gadot and Chris Pine and a more humanistic approach to its conflict, in that the people Diana and Steve are trying to save aren't entirely faceless as they usually are in these movies (even in the MCU). But, at the same time, there's nothing really about this movie that extends the boundaries of what we know the superhero genre to be. It works solely within that framework. And there's nothing wrong with that but, to me, the best superhero movies transcend their framework to become something more, something fresh within this genre and, honestly, I don't think this offered anything fresh. Maybe that's just me. Regardless of all of that, this is still a great superhero movie and, as mentioned, this should have been DC's first step in their attempts to create their own cinematic universe. As such, we cannot turn back time and, as I mentioned earlier, Wonder Woman should be DC's top priority right now. Wonder Woman needs to be the centerpiece of their extended universe if they want to come close to rivaling Marvel. Or even just being a strong number 2. They're number 2 by default, but they're not a strong number 2. With that said, this is a great start to this franchise and I'm eagerly looking forward to more from this character and how DC decides to expand the character. I would easily recommend this.
After her name "Suprema" was replaced with "Wonder Woman," which was a popular term at the time that described women who were exceptionally gifted, the character made her debut in All Star Comics #8 in December 1941. Wonder Woman next appeared in Sensation Comics #1 (January 1942), and six months later, Wonder Woman #1 debuted.[17] Except for four months in 1986, the series has been in print ever since. The stories were initially written by Marston and illustrated by newspaper artist Harry Peter. During his life Marston had written many articles and books on various psychological topics, but his last six years of writing were devoted to his comics creation.

The character has been featured in direct-to-DVD animated films and CGI theatrical releases, such as The Lego Movie (2014). Within the live-action DC Extended Universe films, Wonder Woman debuted in Batman v Superman: Dawn of Justice (2016) and was featured as the main character in Wonder Woman (2017). In November 2017, she appeared in the DCEU release Justice League.
“Anniversary, which we forgot entirely,” Olive Byrne wrote in her secret diary in 1936. (The diary remains in family hands.) During the years when she lived with Marston and Holloway, she wore, instead of a wedding ring, a pair of bracelets. Wonder Woman wears those same cuffs. Byrne died in 1990, at the age of 86. She and Holloway had been living together in an apartment in Tampa. While Byrne was in the hospital, dying, Holloway fell and broke her hip; she was admitted to the same hospital. They were in separate rooms. They’d lived together for 64 years. When Holloway, in her hospital bed, was told that Byrne had died, she sang a poem by Tennyson: “Sunset and the evening star, / And one clear call for me! / And may there be no moaning of the bar, / When I put out to sea.” No newspaper ran an obituary.
After Crisis on Infinite Earths, the character’s origin was slightly retold by Greg Potter and George Perez. In this version, the Amazons were reincarnations of the souls of abused and murdered women from ancient days. In 1200 B.C. a debate occurred on Mount Olympus on how mankind should be made to relate to the gods. Ares, the god of war and destruction, wanted to descend upon the world with his army and crush mankind submission. This was opposed by the others gods present including Artemis, who wanted peace and suggested creating a new race that would lead humans on the right path. Zeus rejected their arguments, and they decided to proceed without his blessing. With the aid of Charon the ferryman, the gods reached the Womb of Gaea, where the souls of women who were abused and murdered at the hands of men were preserved by Gaea herself. Artemis then sent the souls to Greece where they reincarnated into adult women. Aphrodite observed that one soul still remains in the Womb, to which Athena replied that the time had not yet come for that one. The new race in Greece were approached by the goddesses, who bestowed upon them several blessings, charging them with the purpose of leading humanity in the ways of Gaea. They then appointed Hippolyte and Antiope as co-rulers. The civilization is named the Amazons. Stories of this civilization spread throughout Greece and reached the ears of Heracles, who was being manipulated by Ares into attacking the Amazons. Heracles approached the Amazons but was defeated by Hippolyte, upon which he pretended friendship and declared the Amazons allies. When their guard was down, the Greeks drugged the Amazons, taking Hippolyte, Antiope and the other survivors captive. In her cell, Hippolyte is freed by Athena ,who reminds her of her purpose and asked her to avoid revenge and pursue peaceful means. Hippolyte escaped and freed the rest of the Amazons. She shared Athena's message to the Amazons, but blinded by their thirst for revenge, they ruthlessly slaughter the remaining men. Antiope gave Hippolyta her girdle and left to pursue revenge The goddesses appeared and told them they had failed in their purpose and banished them to an island to guard the terrible evil within, as penance. They were granted immortality as long as they did not stray from their new purpose, which would eventually purify their souls. The Amazons built a nation and lived there for 4,000 years. It is during this time that Hippolyte, sole leader of the Amazons, felt an unexplained yearning. Menalippe, the Oracle, told her she was the only Amazon pregnant at the time of her previous incarnation's death, and thus the yearning she felt was the call of her unborn child. As per her advise, Hippolyte went to the shore at sunrise and made a clay figure of a baby. She then cried out to Artemis. The gods, recognizing it was time for the remaining soul in Gaea's womb to depart, infused it into the clay form, which then incarnated as a real child. Blessed with Gaea's greatest gift, life, the gods present bestowed their gifts upon the newborn: Demeter granted the baby great strength, Aphrodite granted her great beauty and a loving heart, Athena granted her great wisdom, Artemis granted her the eye of the hunter and unity with beasts, Hestia granted her sisterhood with fire, and Hermes gave her great speed and the power of flight. Hippolyte named her after a holy warrior, Diana, and she grew up knowing the love of a thousand mothers. Thus Diana of Themyscira was born.
Although seemingly only a purely decorative aspect of her costume, in the golden and silver ages, her earrings were sometimes depicted as giving her the ability to breathe in outer space. Gelignite Grenade Earrings and Grappling Hook Bracelet - In her depowered mod girl phase, Diana on rare occasion employed these devices, which were concealed to look like regular parts of her costume. She acquired them from a demolitions expert and villain which she had helped reform. The grenades were strong enough to blast through a thick steel door and the grappling hook could support easily her body weight to aid in climbing.

Wonder Woman was rebooted in 1987. Writer Greg Potter, who previously created the Jemm, Son of Saturn series for DC, was hired to rework the character. He spent several months working with editor Janice Race[40] on new concepts, before being joined by writer/artist George Pérez.[41] Inspired by John Byrne and Frank Miller's work on refashioning Superman and Batman, Pérez came in as the plotter and penciler of Wonder Woman.[42] Potter dropped out of writing the series after issue #2,[43][44] and Pérez became the sole plotter. Initially, Len Wein replaced Potter but Pérez took on the scripting as of issue #18. Mindy Newell would return to the title as scripter with issue #36 (November 1989).[45] Pérez produced 62 issues of the rebooted title. His relaunch of the character was a critical and sales success.[46]
Pérez and Potter wrote Wonder Woman as a feminist character, and Pérez's research into Greek mythology provided Wonder Woman's world with depth and verisimilitude missing from her previous incarnation.[47][48] The incorporation of Greek gods and sharply characterized villains added a richness to Wonder Woman's Amazon heritage and set her apart from other DC heroes.
Wonder Woman's sexual and bondage themes in her earliest days were not without purpose, however. Her creator, William Moulton Marston, theorized that human relationships could be broken down into dominance, submission, inducement and compliance roles which were embedded into our psyche. Because males were, more often than not, dominant in societies, Marston believed that "Women as a sex, are many times better equipped to assume emotional leadership than are males." [265] Marston wanted to convey his progressive ideals, through his use of bondage imagery, that women are not only capable of leadership roles, but should be in charge of society. Although Marston had good intentions with these themes, in Wonder Woman's early appearances, the bondage elements were controversial, as they were often seen to overly fetishize women in power rather than promote such women. Noah Berlatsky criticized this imagery in Wonder Woman's earliest days noting that "the comics take sensual pleasure in women’s disempowerment." [266] Despite having the mixed messages of this imagery, Marston fiercely believed that women would soon rule the earth and meant to showcase his predictions through sexual themes in his stories. He was an open feminist while studying at Harvard where he once said "Girls are also human beings, a point often overlooked!" [267]
During Marston's run, Diana Prince was the name of an army nurse whom Wonder Woman met. The nurse wanted to meet with her fiancé, who was transferred to South America, but was unable to arrange for money to do so. As Wonder Woman needed a secret identity to look after Steve (who was admitted to the same army hospital in which Diana Prince worked), and because both of them looked alike, Wonder Woman gave the nurse money to go to her fiancé in exchange for the nurse's credentials and took Diana Prince as her alias.[59] She started to work as an army nurse and later as an Air Force secretary.[59][60]
Fans of modern day comic book characters would have some difficulty relating to characters from the early golden age, and Wonder Woman is no exception. In her first appearance in the comics, she has obviously fulfilled the role of an icon for readers, but so too did her secret identity, Diana Prince. The character was created in a time when different cultural and societal norms existed in North America.
She later became a major character in the DC Animated Universe in Justice League and its sequel, Justice League Unlimited. Both shows were massively popular and helped bring Wonder Woman back to relevance for a younger generation. The DCAU is notable for introducing the idea of a romance between Batman and Wonder Woman, something that was unheard of in the original comic books. Throughout the DCAU, Wonder Woman was voiced by Susan Eisenberg.

Some men were unhappy with women-only screenings held at the Alamo Drafthouse Cinema in Austin, with some opponents of the gender-restricted screening stating on platforms such as Facebook that such screenings were discriminatory against men.[171][172][173] A gay Albany Law School professor initiated a complaint with Austin's Equal Employment and Fair Housing Office claiming discrimination against male prospective customers and employees of the theater.[174] The chain responded with an online statement saying the event "may have created confusion—we want everybody to see this film" and announced a similar event at their Brooklyn location. Tickets sold out in less than an hour, prompting the chain to schedule additional screenings.[171] On July 18, Alamo Drafthouse proposed settlement offers of a Wonder Woman DVD to the complainants, stating "Respondent did not realize that advertising a 'women's only' screening was a violation of discrimination laws."[175]

The Gods, led by Athena, create the Amazons in Greece to realize their ideals and bring humans into following them. The leader of the Amazons, Hippolyta feels a yearning for a child). She makes a clay form of a child and prays to the Gods. Hearing this the Gods give the clay form, transforming it into a live child blessed with Gaea's gift, life. The Gods grant her various abilities and she grows up as Diana of Themyscira.


Wonder Woman's character was created during World War II; the character in the story was initially depicted fighting Axis military forces as well as an assortment of colorful supervillains, although over time her stories came to place greater emphasis on characters, deities, and monsters from Greek mythology. Many stories depicted Wonder Woman rescuing herself from bondage, which defeated the "damsels in distress" trope that was common in comics during the 1940s.[13][14] In the decades since her debut, Wonder Woman has gained a cast of enemies bent on eliminating the Amazon, including classic villains such as Ares, Cheetah, Doctor Poison, Circe, Doctor Psycho, and Giganta, along with more recent adversaries such as Veronica Cale and the First Born. Wonder Woman has also regularly appeared in comic books featuring the superhero teams Justice Society (from 1941) and Justice League (from 1960).[15]
Wonder Woman is a fictional superheroine, appearing in American comic books published by DC Comics. The character is a founding member of the Justice League. The character first appeared in All Star Comics #8 in October 1941[1] with her first feature in Sensation Comics #1, January 1942. The Wonder Woman title has been published by DC Comics almost continuously except for a brief hiatus in 1986.[3] In her homeland, the island nation of Themyscira, her official title is Princess Diana of Themyscira, Daughter of Hippolyta. She has no father; she was created out of clay and brought to life by the gods of Olympus. When blending into the society outside of her homeland, she sometimes adopts her civilian identity Diana Prince.[4]
Confinement to WW and the Amazons is just a sporting game, an actual enjoyment of being subdued. This, my dear friend, is the one truly great contribution of my Wonder Woman strip to moral education of the young. The only hope for peace is to teach people who are full of pep and unbound force to enjoy being bound. Women are exciting for this one reason – it is the secret of women's allure – women enjoy submission, being bound. This I bring out in the Paradise Island sequences where the girls beg for chains and enjoy wearing them.
Up to this point, I had watched all of the DCEU movies and have been entertained, but not particularly impressed. When I walked away from Batman V Superman, Wonder Woman was without a doubt the best part and I had hopes for her solo film. After Suicide Squad, my hopes were lessened, but still present. After seeing the film twice I can confidently say it is one of, if not the greatest super hero movies ever made.

Marston's character was a native of an all-female utopia of Amazons who became a crime-fighting U.S. government agent, using her superhuman strength and agility, and her ability to force villains to submit and tell the truth by binding them with her magic lasso.[17] Her appearance was believed by some to be based somewhat on Olive Byrne, and her heavy bronze bracelets (which she used to deflect bullets) were inspired by the jewelry bracelets worn by Byrne.[18]


A Blackfoot demi-god,[52] and a smuggler who trades with both sides of the war and knows how to get people across the front lines.[48][53] On his casting, Brave Rock said, "I had no idea it was for Wonder Woman. I lost it when I showed up and I couldn't remember my lines. I didn't take it literally until a month later, I got a call saying I got the role and they wanted me to fly to London for a fitting."[54] Brave Rock raised several concerns with Jenkins over the representation of the character in the film, particularly that he was not comfortable playing into stereotypes and that he was not keen on his character being simply known as "Chief".[55] Jenkins responded by giving him some extra creative control over his character which Brave Rock says was "unprecedented".[55]
John Byrne's run included a period in which Diana's mother Hippolyta served as Wonder Woman, having traveled back to the 1940s, while Diana ascended to Mount Olympus as the Goddess of Truth after being killed in issue #124. In addition, Wonder Woman's Amazon ally Nubia was re-introduced as Nu'Bia, scripted by a different author.[40] Byrne posited that Hippolyta had been the Golden Age Wonder Woman. Byrne restored the series' status quo in his last issue.[41]
The origin of Wonder Woman and the psychological reasoning behind why William Morton Marston created her in the way he did illustrated Marston's educational, ethical, and moral values.[226] "William Marston intended her to be a feminist character, showing young boys the illimitable possibilities of a woman who could be considered just as strong as the famed Superman." Gladys L. Knight explains the impact and influences that superheroes have on us in society ranging from the 1870s until the present day.
Gaines was troubled. Roubicek, who worked on Superman, too, had invented kryptonite. She believed superheroes ought to have vulnerabilities. She told Gaines she thought Wonder Woman ought to be more like Superman and, just as Superman couldn’t go back to the planet Krypton, Wonder Woman ought not to be able to go back to Paradise Island, where the kinkiest stuff tended to happen. Gaines then sent Roubicek to Bellevue Hospital to interview Bender. In a memo to Gaines, Roubicek reported that Bender “does not believe that Wonder Woman tends to masochism or sadism.” She also liked the way Marston was playing with feminism, Roubicek reported: “She believes that Dr. Marston is handling very cleverly this whole ‘experiment’ as she calls it. She feels that perhaps he is bringing to the public the real issue at stake in the world (and one which she feels may possibly be a direct cause of the present conflict) and that is that the difference between the sexes is not a sex problem, nor a struggle for superiority, but rather a problem of the relation of one sex to the other.” Roubicek summed up: “Dr. Bender believes that this strip should be left alone.”

Steve Trevor's secretary who befriends Diana.[44] Describing her character, Davis said, "She's a woman in a man's world and so being heard and seen aren't the easiest things, but it kind of doesn't deter her", adding, "Etta is unapologetically herself and I think that that's the thing that has drawn me to her the most".[45] When asked if she was previously familiar with the character, Davis responded, "No. I wasn't. It took me a while to know that I was auditioning for Etta because even when I found out it was Wonder Woman, I still had no idea what the role was. It took a little while then I Googled the character".[46] On Etta Candy's relationship with Steve Trevor, Davis said, "One of the great things that Etta gets to work with Steve Trevor is because Steve is not your typical man, in that he does entrust her with things that in 1918 probably wouldn't have been entrusted to a secretary of somebody who is quite important", further explaining, "So I think that [Trevor] needs her just as much as she needs that because now she's been given responsibility that she wouldn't have normally be given before, and equally he has somebody who could probably fly under the radar a bit. So he can trust the person who no one's really looking at".[47]


Carolyn Cocca has stated that Wonder Woman possesses a "duality of character" due to the character possessing both feminine and masculine qualities in her physical abilities and attitude, which Cocca felt made her more appealing to a wide audience.[224] Wonder Woman's first female editor, Karen Berger, claimed that, "Wonder Woman [is] a great role model to young women, but also contains many elements that appeal to males as well. Wonder Woman crosses the gender line.".[224] Berger worked with George Pérez on the new issues of Wonder Woman starting in 1987, and the new Diana "works with friends and allies to teach lessons of peace and equality."[225]
Comic books were more or less invented in 1933 by Maxwell Charles Gaines, a former elementary school principal who went on to found All-American Comics. Superman first bounded over tall buildings in 1938. Batman began lurking in the shadows in 1939. Kids read them by the piles. But at a time when war was ravaging Europe, comic books celebrated violence, even sexual violence. In 1940, the Chicago Daily News called comics a “national disgrace.” “Ten million copies of these sex-horror serials are sold every month,” wrote the newspaper’s literary editor, calling for parents and teachers to ban the comics, “unless we want a coming generation even more ferocious than the present one.”
The first of these half-mortal siblings to reveal himself to Wonder Woman was her older half-brother, Lennox Sandsmark, who could transform himself into living, marble-like stone and, before his death, was revealed to be the father of Wonder Girl (Cassie Sandsmark).[137] His killer, the First Born, the eldest progeny of Zeus, would become Wonder Woman's first major super-villain of the New 52.
Wonder Woman had its world premiere on May 15, 2017, in Shanghai. It premiered on May 25, 2017, in Los Angeles.[146] The film's London premiere, which was scheduled to take place on May 31 at the Odeon Leicester Square, was cancelled due to the 2017 Manchester Arena bombing.[147] The film had its Latin America premiere in Mexico City on May 27. It was released in most of the world, including in IMAX,[148] on June 2, 2017, after originally being scheduled for June 23.[149][150] Belgium, Singapore and South Korea received the film first, with May 31 openings.[151][152][153] On April 17, it was announced that Wonder Woman would be released in China on June 2, the same day as its North American release.[154]

The series began at a time when violence on television was under intense scrutiny. As a result, Wonder Woman was less frequently seen punching or kicking people the way she did in the early episodes. She would usually be shown pushing and throwing enemies or using creativity to get them to somehow knock themselves out (such as jumping high into the air to cause pursuers to collide). Despite the wartime setting, she almost never resorted to deadly force. The only exception occurs in the pilot episode when she sinks a German U-boat by crashing an airplane into it, presumably killing everyone aboard. Wonder Woman herself was occasionally overpowered by chloroform and poison gas, but she always came back in the second half of the show to save the day. In some episodes, her enemies learn the secret of her superhuman strength – her magic belt – and temporarily steal it, leaving her with average human strength. Her indestructible lasso and bracelets were stolen or taken away in one episode (leaving her defenseless against gunfire), but Wonder Woman recovered them by the end of the episode. (In the comics, Wonder Woman would lose most of her strength if bound by a man.)
In Challenge of the Gods, Diana is already accustomed to the “man’s world” she had been unaware of during her time at Paradise Island, and even happens to be a sort a celebrity, which is a factor that the character would deal with again and again as she is introduced to modern society. Wonder Woman has to fight a new villain, Cheetah; manage Zeus, who is assessing if Diana would make a good wife; and even pacify internal conflicts among the Amazonians.

After Diana's clash with Silver Swan, she goes to Greece, where Julia is staying. Here she meets Julia's friend, renowned Epigraphist Stavros Christadoulodou. Here, a conspiracy is shown to be in play with a mysterious woman behind it, dwelling in an undisclosed location, speaking to her servant Mikos about Diana's presence and how it could be a threat. A rebel group is revealed to be in existence, secretly fighting the witch's forces, headed by a man named Gregory, who had lost his son's to the witch's monsters. The witch uses her servants disguised as animals to kill her enemies in the rebel group. The rebel faction also has Katina and Spiros as it's members, actively tracking other followers of the witch and trying to keep Diana safe from harm. She goes on boat to an island called Cephalonia when she is distracted by another small island in the vicinity. She senses a strange presence in the island and is somehow attacked by it's mysterious resident psychically, as a warning, causing her to faint on the spot. In the hospital, Diana is surrounded by her friends and some wonder if it's the Magia, a curse that some believe is pure superstition. The Magia is said to come from the mysterious island, where a witch is said to exist. Diana is introduced to Theophilius Ventouras, one of the wealthiest people in the area by Julia, who is actually another pawn of the witch, and he deceives Diana and her friends into thinking the woman is actually a rich loner and there is no truth in the myths about the Magia and the Witch. Stavros meets with Gregory and is given a scroll that the faction had obtained from the island, which may contain secrets about the witch.
My 78 year old Father (who introduced me to Wonder Woman at such a young and impressionable age... thank you, dad ♡) and I saw this movie together for the first time and many times in the theater again and again. Both of us were SO beyond happy with this film! Gal Gadot stole both of our hearts and admiration! She is beyond talented and daaamn she kicks major boo-tay as Wonder Woman! ;)
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Wonder Woman is the most popular female comic-book superhero of all time. Aside from Superman and Batman, no other comic-book character has lasted as long. Generations of girls have carried their sandwiches to school in Wonder Woman lunchboxes. Like every other superhero, Wonder Woman has a secret identity. Unlike every other superhero, she also has a secret history.
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